There’s a saying – “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”. Everyone knows this. So why would one of the most famous (and definitely in no way broke) companies in the world decide to rebrand?

Google, one of the few companies to achieve “Dictionary word” status – (as in “Dude, google it”) – has undergone a significant restructuring. The search giant will now become a subsidiary of a new parent company called…. ALPHABET.

Co-founders, Larry Page (CEO) and Sergey Brin (President) stated in a post on the official Google blog, that the reason for this change is the desire to make Google “cleaner and more accountable”. The pair intend to focus their efforts on developing their other ventures, particularly in healthcare, drone production and investment:

“This newer Google is a bit slimmed down, with the companies that are pretty far afield of our main Internet products contained in Alphabet instead…Good examples are our health efforts: Life Sciences (that works on the glucose-sensing contact lens), and Calico (focused on longevity)….

…Sergey and I are seriously in the business of starting new things. Alphabet will also include our X lab, which incubates new efforts like Wing, our drone delivery effort. We are also stoked about growing our investment arms, Ventures and Capital, as part of this new structure”.

But as the Google bosses move on up, they have no intention of leaving their precious brainchild unattended. They’ve appointed another innovative leader, 43-year old Sundar Pinchai, former Senior Vice-President of product, the new CEO of Google.

Sundar Pichai, senior vice president of Chrome and Apps at Google Inc., speaks during the Google I/O conference in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Thursday, June 28, 2012. Google Inc., owner of the world's most popular search engine, unveiled a cloud-computing service for building and running applications to help woo customers and challenge Amazon.com Inc.'s Web Services. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

 

Don’t let the simple name fool you. With drones, glucose-detecting contact lenses, and longevity as part of their roster, Alphabet is emerging from the seeds planted by Google to remain in the fast lane of technology.